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    i am someone who never attended comapny parties, solely because I have felt left out in my company multiple times during gatherings. I don't speak the local tounge and i find it very embarassing to go to parties where people don't even respect culture. So if anyone is not going, I am sure they have reasons.

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23 answers • Office Culture

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    Lack of leadership in the executive team, micro managing , favoritism with “golden child” developer who bullies the entire team, lack of HR policies, devoid of good culture, lack of appreciation

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20 answers • Office Culture

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    I am sorry, but I don’t discuss personal finance politics, or religion at work. I don’t think discussing any of these topics would benefit our company in a positive way.

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12 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    Pick the right company where that's not part of the culture.

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10 answers • Office Culture

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    People doing too much of their own thing and not working together as part of a larger plan to achieve big goals.

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8 answers • Office Culture

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    Robert Shah, a sales representative for Quality Office Supplies Corporation, will receive a substantial bonus if he meets his annual sales goal. The company’s recognition point for sales is the day of shipment. On December 31, Shah realizes he needs sales of $2,000 to reach his sales goal and receive the bonus. He calls a purchaser for a local insurance company, whom he knows well, and asks him to buy $2,000 worth of copier paper today. The purchaser says, “But Robert, that’s more than a year’s supply for us.” Shah says, “Buy it today. If you decide it’s too much, you can return however much you want for full credit next month.” The purchaser says, “Okay, ship it.” The paper is shipped on December 31 and recorded as a sale. On January 15, the purchaser returns $1,750 worth of paper for full credit (approved by Shah) against the bill. a) Should the shipment on December 31 be recorded as a sale? b) Discuss the ethics of Shah’s action.

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7 answers • Office Culture

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    Robert Shah, a sales representative for Quality Office Supplies Corporation, will receive a substantial bonus if he meets his annual sales goal. The company’s recognition point for sales is the day of shipment. On December 31, Shah realizes he needs sales of $2,000 to reach his sales goal and receive the bonus. He calls a purchaser for a local insurance company, whom he knows well, and asks him to buy $2,000 worth of copier paper today. The purchaser says, “But Robert, that’s more than a year’s supply for us.” Shah says, “Buy it today. If you decide it’s too much, you can return however much you want for full credit next month.” The purchaser says, “Okay, ship it.” The paper is shipped on December 31 and recorded as a sale. On January 15, the purchaser returns $1,750 worth of paper for full credit (approved by Shah) against the bill. a) Should the shipment on December 31 be recorded as a sale? b) Discuss the ethics of Shah’s action.

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16 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    Someone who thinks they know better than you when they don't.

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14 answers • Office Culture

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    Refusal to hire/consider for hiring people over 50.

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7 answers • Office Culture

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    There have been situations where fired employees came back and it was a DARK day for everyone. Safety reasons they have to scorch out and see to it that you don’t come back in

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16 answers • Office Culture

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    Bad attitudes from employees, including employees that have "checked out". Employees needing to take a larger than normal amount of time off when not actually going on vacation. Employers that have no boundaries.

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32 answers • Office Culture

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    If the office supply cannot be replaced for less than $2, then I would consider it stealing.

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12 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    My company uses a quarterly system to decide the amount of raises.

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12 answers • Office Culture

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    I would approach the co-worker first and tell them your concerns.

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29 answers • Office Culture

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    Absolutely! They might ask you if you've talked to your supervisor first, to address the issue. And you usually go to HR if your coworker's supervisor is protecting/defending the bully, which happens most of the time. And you should have documented the problem for months, with dates and things said, etc. Did you know you can only file bullying harassment problems within 6 months of the last incident? The US has NEVER prosecuted a workplace bullying issue! Yet ironically 67% of higher education faculty and staff experience workplace bullying. Nursing is the 2nd highest, at 45%. Sexual harassment of female scientists is as high as 64% as well, with 22% getting sexually assaulted.

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20 answers • Office Culture

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    The biggest sign a corporate culture is toxic, is constant arguing or tolerance of abuse. This directly related to a lack of self-awareness, communication, caring, and coworker/employee support.

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20 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    Happiness comes from within, and many people don't realize they even HAVE a negative attitude! Also most managers are UNWILLING to address uncomfortable issues with their subordinates or coworkers. But it's important that managers address an employees' negative attitude, otherwise it can create a toxic or unpleasant work environment for everyone else.

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9 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    It's important for employees to be proactive and choose the work that they want to expand. So not avoiding work, but making things efficient so they're maintained more easily! And maybe the manager doesn't know how to delegate or estimate the demand for employees' time? Do they need a full-time employee? Just telling your employees to delegate work isn't sufficient, if managers aren't willing to help initiate projects.

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13 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    Statistically, mediocre managers get promoted, AND many managers get comfortable and STOP striving to learn more on how to engage their employees and bring out the best in everyone! EVEN WHEN you gave them a copy of Gallup's "12 Elements of Great Managers" book, which is incredible.

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19 answers • Office Culture

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    Look at your leadership. What is their way of communicating? Are they effective at leading the team? Are they guiding, empowering managers to lead and nurture well? Do leaders and managers exhibit strong emotional intelligence? Staff members in leadership positions are responsible, so hold them accountable. Furthermore, find out what your employees desire the most. Or like already. Or struggle with. Is it low pay? Long hours or poor work/life balance? An inadequate or even badly behaving manager? Fix it so they don't go somewhere that offers something better. Also, is your "culture" sustainable? Research and find out what truly promotes productivity, healthy people, and stop or shift anything that gets in the way. Even if it looks fun or nice, it may not be working and might be resulting in unintended poor work environment or experiences. Thus, high turnover.

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14 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    By treating each one exactly the same, being consistent is the key.

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8 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    Thinking of the person's consequences in their life.

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15 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    I think it's cheating to spend more than you usually would on yourself on dining, etc., unless you are entertaining a very high-value individual for your business. I had luxurious (I thought) expense accounts when I traveled for the Red Cross, and I donated back whatever I did not use, which was a lot. Maybe I am unusually honest in today's climate, IDK.

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12 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    Eveey company has growing pains

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13 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    The more 3-D, surround, altered reality games that there are, the less interaction with employees, so less chance of offending or angering the customers.

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9 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    Yep, you won't have a job for a while, and unless you have enough vacation time saved up & depending on your position (possible leave of absence.) Hopefully can afford COBRA because your insurance will lapse. You are welcome to come back and reapply (starting over,) when you are ready to return to work.

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7 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    Engagement

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18 answers • Office Culture

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    Two weeks notice is a sign of respect. You are giving the company a chace to replace you without making it too difficult for your coworkers.

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13 answers • Office Culture

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    Not including you in meetings or email threads that you really should have been in/on.

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7 answers • Office Culture

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    Favoritism

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3 answers • Office Culture

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    It can set an attitude of what is acceptable.

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17 answers • Office Culture

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    Some Americans are overly invested in their jobs. Americans self identify more with what they do as who they are. I think Americans who are career driven in salaried positions do not feel they can be away from work for extended periods.

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15 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    At least 30 days.

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50 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    While it should be okay, depending on the work environment you do it anyway.

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40 answers • Office Culture

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    Top Employee Response

    Depends on attitude and if a team player.

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60 answers • Office Culture